Dry Cheese and Milk On The Windowsill

This week we will start a new series from the German magazine, Story.  They have done a special edition in honor of Queen Fabiola after her death on 5 December 2014. Their story is Fabiola in 7 Anecdotes.

Dry Cheese and Milk On The Windowsill

Both459During Baudouin’s reign, the menu was very basic at the Castle of Laken. It was the royal couple themselves who often turned out the lights at night. According to close aids, the motto of the royal couple was “no ostentatious luxury” and as the saying goes in Dutch, “every nickel was turned seven times before being spent.”

Even the receptions at the castle couldn’t be too expensive. A worker at the palace said that “it was a public secret that one didn’t eat very well at the palace back then.” At official ceremonies, staff had to make the rounds with “plates with dry cheese chunks, until people started laughing with it.”

Baudouin’s grand Marshal, Herman Liebaers, told how the royal couple received a thousand bottles of the grand-cru wine Hospice de Beaune as a wedding present. Sixteen years later, only fourteen bottles were empty. “When the weather was cold, the queen put the milk outside on the windowsill” says another worker at the palace. “She thought it was cozier and more homey than milk out of the fridge. But it was a strange sight seeing bottles of milk outside the window of the Palace of Laeken.”

Long after King Baudouin’s death, Fabiola took her own sandwiches with her when she was away during lunch. She would ask her chauffeur to stop for a while in a parking lot, so she could eat in the backseat. When she went away with her nieces and nephews on private occasions, she made the sandwiches herself.


 

I would like to thank a dear friend, Isabelle from Belgium, for her work as translator of this story. Thank you, my friend.

Blog Origins

Hands holding sapling in soilI’ve always been a casual student of royal history and particularly certain families which spark my interest. Recently I’ve been philosophically reflecting upon biblical and historical teachings on righteousness.  There are some people that truly seem to live out Romans 6 as slaves to sin, but King Baudouin of Belgium certainly wasn’t one. He was a slave to righteousness. God reckoned him righteous and he was, indeed, a righteous man. And, when it came time to choose his queen, he likewise chose a righteous woman. This is where two of my interests intersected. The more I studied Baudouin and Fabiola, the more I was inspired by their lives, their words, their smiles. I had some rather good (I hope you agree) posts on some royal forums and didn’t want to lose track of any of that information, so I decided to start this blog. There is a companion YouTube Playlist and Pinterest board where I try to bring something NEW, not just the same pictures and the same subjective ideas. I hope you enjoy this blog. It is meant to inspire as I have been inspired by these two righteous souls.

Media Myths Series: The Monk-King

B98In this first post for my Media Myths Series covering media bias and fabrications, I will focus on some obvious mistaken or misleading information produced by Belgian and European media based on un-named “insiders” who claim intimate knowledge of the King. This one deals with the claim that Baudouin wanted to abdicate in favor of a monastic life.

It is quite obvious, based on his life and photo evidence that he absolutely did not want the secluded life of a religious. He wanted a wife – a traditional wife and a traditional life. He was already miserably secluded in the Palace at Laeken and hated being so. His dreadful unhappiness shown on his face and through the pain in his eyes. Indeed, his spiritual mentor, Cardinal Léon Joseph Suenens, who after Baudouin’s untimely death wrote a book on the King’s inspiring faith, never mentions anything about the King wanting the solitary life of a religious. Cardinal Suenens and Baudouin discussed his painful isolation in Laeken Palace and his desire to find a spouse. After meeting innumerable European princesses and finding no connection with them, Baudouin asks the Cardinal to assist in a search for a suitable Roman Catholic young lady of great spiritual depth and faith to match his own.

Therefore, by this evidence, there is no logic or proof in the media’s assertion that Baudouin wanted to live a monastic life.

Courage Madame la Reine!

Courage Madame la Reine

Courage Madame la Reine

One of the most poignant moments surrounding the funeral of Baudouin came when his body was transferred from Laeken to the palace at Brussels. The cortege stoppied at the Colonne du Congrès, repose le Soldat inconnu (monument of the unknown soldier). The royal family listens as the Brabant is played. When the queen is getting back into the vehicle, someone shouted, “Courage Madame la Reine!” Her deep courage and strength carried her through the events of the funeral and oath of Albert II.

You can hear the shouts of encouragement at the end of this video.

Baudouin I : Common King – Uncommon Man

Born Sept. 7, 1930, Stuyvenberg Castle, near Brussels, Belgium
Died July 31, 1993, VIlla Astrida – Motril, Spain

King of the Belgians – The son of King Leopold III, Baudouin lived with his family under house arrest in German-occupied Belgium during World War II. After postwar exile in Switzerland, Baudouin became king on his father’s abdication (1951). He helped restore confidence in the monarchy after the stormy reign of his father and became a unifying force in a country divided between Flemish- (Dutch- ) and French-speaking factions. Because Baudouin and his wife, Fabiola, were childless, he was succeeded by his brother, Albert II.

Music: Salvation for a Proud Nation – Immediate – Trailerhead: Saga

No Copyright Intended or implied
No copyright is claimed and to the extent that material may appear to be infringed, I assert that such alleged infringement is permissible under fair use principles in U.S. copyright laws. If you believe material has been used in an unauthorized manner, please contact the poster.